Importing your existing documents and screenplays into Movie Draft

More than likely, you will have already started writing your screenplay in another program, but it's ok. I forgive you. The following is therefore a guide on the best way to open your existing documents in Movie Draft so that you may carry on where you left off.

Microsoft Word (*.DOC)

  1. From Microsoft Word, choose the File > Save As... menu item.
  2. From the "Save as type" / "Format" drop-down menu, choose "Plain Text (.txt)".
  3. Press Save. That will create a plain text (*.txt) file.
  4. In Movie Draft, go to the File > Open menu.

Movie Draft can open Microsoft Word documents but it's not foolproof. The *.doc file format is a proprietary file format. I have tried to reverse-engineer it as best as I can but it occasionally leaves a lot of formatting left for the user. Because of that, I'd recommend the above method instead.

Microsoft Word (*.DOCX)

If you're on the Mac:

  1. From MS Word, save as normal.
  2. In Movie Draft, go to the File > Open menu.

But if you're not on a Mac, of if you experience difficulties, use the same method as described above for the *.doc file format.

Final Draft v8 (*.FDX)

  1. In Movie Draft, go to the File > Open menu.

Movie Draft can open and save Final Draft v8 documents natively. There are a few limitations, however - Dual Dialog is not currently supported, neither is the "General" scene element. If you have those in your script, please amend them for the time being.

Final Draft v5-7 (*.FDR)

  1. From Final Draft, choose the File > Save As... menu item.
  2. From the "Save as type" / "Format" drop-down menu, choose "Text Only with Layout". (The "with layout" is important here)
  3. Press Save. That will create a plain text (*.txt) file.
  4. In Movie Draft, go to the File > Open menu.

Movie Draft can open Final Draft v5-7 documents but it's not foolproof. As with the .doc, the *.fdr file format is a proprietary file format. I have tried to reverse-engineer it as best as I can but it occasionally leaves a lot of formatting left for the user. Because of that, I'd recommend the above method instead.

Movie Magic Screenwriter v6 (*.MMSW)

  1. From Screenwriter, choose the File > Save A Copy... menu item.
  2. From the "Save as type" / "Format" drop-down menu, choose "Plain Text (.txt)".
  3. Press Save. That will create a plain text (*.txt) file.
  4. In Movie Draft, go to the File > Open menu.

The above will probably work for the older versions of Movie Magic Screenwriter too but I do not have a copy to verify this. If you do, please let me know.

SceneWriter Pro (*.SWP and *.OSFX)

  1. From SceneWriter Pro, save as normal.
  2. In Movie Draft, go to the File > Open menu.

Movie Draft can open SceneWriter Pro documents natively and will convert your "alternative scenes" to hidden scenes upon import.

Anything else

If in doubt, save your document as a Plain Text (*.txt) file with all the formatting retained if possible.

Video introduction

Get a quick overview of Movie Draft's key features by watching the following video:

View a 15 minute introduction to Movie Draft narrated by it's creator, Mark O'Neill